Tag Archives: oral care

Fun Facts about the Tooth Fairy

Fun Facts about the Tooth Fairy

The legend of the Tooth Fairy is one of the most popular and iconic childhood stories in the world. Unlike Santa Claus, the tooth fairy will leave children a gift only if they offer one of their baby teeth as an exchange – they don’t necessarily have to be good year round!
The tooth fairy has quite an elusive backstory. The majority of parents around the world do not know where this popular tradition began! Does it have a single origin, now embodied in the magical princess we know and love today? Let’s break down the myth and dig into some of the dainty details of the Tooth Fairy.

The Tooth Fairy is younger than you might have thought

 The Tooth Fairy is younger than you might have thought

The history of some of the world’s most popular childhood figures go back hundreds of years. In fact, Santa Claus can be traced all the way back to the birth of St. Nicholas around 280AD. The Easter Bunny, on the other hand, can be traced back to the 17th century with the arrival of German immigrants on North American soil. The Tooth Fairy, however, was not mentioned until the early 20th century in the Chicago Daily Tribune, when an article touched on the existence of the dainty Fairy in a “Household Hints” column back in September of 1908.
The Tooth Fairy was not popularized until 1927, when children’s author Esther Watkins Arnold wrote a play famously named – The Tooth Fairy.

Once again, the Vikings were there first

Once again, the Vikings were there first

The Vikings, who pioneered many of the expeditions that lead to the discovery of the new world, seem to have developed something similar to the modern Tooth Fairy as well.
Researching the 13th century Scandinavian myths and poetry, the Norse Eddas, historians were able to transcribe the Viking language and successfully reference something that the Vikings called tand-f é, or tooth fee. In these writings, they described a ritual that took place between the parents and the child, in which the mother would offer a small payment to the child in exchange for its first tooth.
It is believed that many Viking warriors wore their children’s teeth around their necks into battle, as they believed the teeth had magical powers that will protect them in battle and bestow courage in their hearts.

The Tooth Fairy comes in many forms across the world

The Tooth Fairy comes in many forms across the world

Believe it or not, the majority of baby-tooth traditions around the world are connected to rodents. So much so, that the tooth fairy can be a squirrel, a mouse or a rat, depending on the tradition and the nationality where the story was born. In Belgium and France, the Fairy is, in fact, a mouse that comes to collect not only baby teeth the kids leave out for him, but also morsels of cheese.
On the other hand, the Spanish El Ratoncito Perez was created by an author called Luis Coloma as a Tooth Fairy analog for the king of the Spanish empire, Alfonso XIII in the 19th century. EL Ratoncito Perez is to this day widely recognized in Spanish speaking countries around the world as the real Tooth Fairy.
The Tooth Fairy does remain an elusive modern-day concept, perhaps due to its diverse history and a lack of a unified story that would determine the true nature of the famous dental deity. However, cultural diversity is one of the things that makes for intriguing stories like these, and no matter where it comes from, and no matter the shape it embodies, the Tooth Fairy is, and will remain, one of the most thrilling magical creatures for children around the world.

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Most Common Health Problems Linked to Poor Oral Hygiene

Most Common Health Problems Linked to Poor Oral Hygiene

Good oral hygiene is a prerequisite for healthy teeth, a pearly white smile, and fresh breath. However, good oral hygiene is also associated with better overall health.
Some health problems come to life more frequently than others. To make sure you adhere to your teeth brushing routine, here is some insight on common health problems linked to poor oral hygiene.

Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular Disease

If you allow dangerous bacteria to form in your mouth due to infrequent brushing and flossing, you can significantly increase the risk of heart disease and other subsequent health conditions. Bacteria can travel into your bloodstream and reach the arteries of the heart, where they can contribute to a condition called atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the hardening of the arteries from plaques that form on their inner linings, which in turn results in restricted blood flow or complete blocking of these passageways.
Atherosclerosis greatly elevates the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Further complications can entail the hardening of the inner lining of the heart, resulting in a dangerous condition called endocarditis.

Respiratory Problems

Oral Hygiene

By exposing your respiratory tract to hazardous bacteria from diseased teeth and gums, you run the risk of developing respiratory problems, and even pneumonia. Prolonged exposure can affect the lungs as well. . When respiratory conditions do appear, they can be very hard to treat, while a pneumonia could land you a visit to the emergency room.

Increased Risk of Dementia

Increased Risk of Dementia

Alzheimer’s is a disease that could strike anyone at any moment, and can be related to bad oral hygiene. Harmful bacteria from gingivitis can easily find its way towards the brain via the bloodstream or the nerve network in the head, increasing the chances of developing degenerative diseases in the brain, such as Alzheimer’s.

Supports Chronic Disease

Supports Chronic Disease

Poor oral hygiene has been found to have a significant effect on chronic illnesses, particularly diabetes and arthritis. Periodontal disease can worsen the symptoms of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, and also pose great threat to individuals suffering from type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Conditions such as periodontal disease and gum tissue inflammation can hinder the body’s ability to control blood sugar levels. Oral hygiene is of the utmost importance for people suffering from chronic illnesses.

While these conditions do pose a realistic threat in response to poor dental health, they can be easily avoided. Follow a good oral hygiene routine and you will help keep illnesses at bay while dazzling the world with your pearly whites!

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Fun Dental Facts You Probably Didn’t Know

Fun Dental Facts You Probably Didn't Know

Unless you are getting ready for a date or a visit to the dentist , you might not spend a lot of time paying attention to your teeth. Moreover, your dental care takes up a measly five-minutes of your day, if not even less, flossing included. Some fun dental fact you probably didn’t know.
Yet our teeth have surprisingly versatile roles in our lives, from digestion and speaking to providing physical support to our mouth, and giving us a very important form of non-verbal communication – a ravishing smile. Therefore, your teeth deserve more attention and extra care, so these fun facts about dental care will inspire you to appreciate them more!

 1. About 55% of people would share their toothbrush

Fun Dental Facts

Whether it’s with your significant other (28%), which is least harmful for an obvious reason, with your kids (18%), a friend (7%) or perhaps a celebrity (6%). Surprisingly enough, over a half of the world’s population is willing to share their toothbrush. Our friendly advice: don’t, it’s not worth the risk.

Source: http://www.nationalsmilemonth.org/facts-figures/

 2. We spend almost 39 days in our lifetime brushing our teeth…

We spend almost 39 days in our lifetime brushing our teeth...

…but in reality, we should spend at least 122 days if we were to follow our dentists’ instructions religiously and brush for at least 2 minutes every time! In fact, most people spend under one minute on this life-saving activity, so it might be a good idea to use a timer.

Source: https://www.nationaldentalcare.com.au/30-fantastic-toothbrush-facts/

 3. Selfies can help you improve your brushing skills

Selfies can help you improve your brushing skills

Now here’s a brain-teaser! Apparently, according to research conducted by the Case Western Reserve University, if you use your smartphone to record yourself while brushing, you and your dentist can gain new insights into your dental care habits. That will allow you to change unhealthy patterns and learn proper brushing more quickly.

Source: http://thedaily.case.edu/study-reveals-recording-selfies-while-brushing-teeth-can-improve-oral-health/

 4. More people seem to own a phone than a toothbrush

More people seem to own a phone than a toothbrush

While it’s almost impossible to establish the numbers accurately, it seems that compared to 4 billion phone owners, there are approximately 3.22 billion toothbrush users in the world. Time for a change in priorities?

Source: https://blog.dentalimplants-usa.com/more-mobile-phones-than-toothbrushes-fact-or-fiction

 5. Brushing regularly can burn over 3500 calories per year

Brushing regularly can burn over 3500 calories per year

If you need extra motivation to brush three times a day for at least two recommended minutes, it will help you lose a kilo per year just by brushing!

Source: https://www.nationaldentalcare.com.au/30-fantastic-toothbrush-facts/

 6. You should replace your toothbrush after a cold or a flu

You should replace your toothbrush after a cold or a flu

Even though this is advised, we have a perfect solution for you to keep your brush head a few more days before you need to replace it. Violife’s toothbrush sanitizers will kill 99.9% of germs and bacteria thanks to the powerful germicidal ultraviolet bulb. It’s powerful against nasty germs like H1N1, E. Coli, Staph, Salmonella, Strep, and Listeria. Violife’s UV Toothbrush Sanitizers penetrate the cells of bacteria, disrupting their DNA and killing all the disease causing agents. Read more about How UV Light Sanitizes your Toothbrush.

Source: http://www.artistictouchdentistry.com/general-dentistry/7-interesting-oral-hygiene-facts-you-probably-didnt-know/

7. Too much soda can lead to 62% more dental problems

Too much soda can lead to 62% more dental problems

Dental care goes beyond our brushing routine. That’s why it’s essential to focus on a healthy diet and teeth-friendly foods to protect your oral health, so skip those sugary drinks and replace them with something nutritious. Only three glasses per day can wreak havoc on your pearly whites.

Source: http://dentaluxpa.com/interesting-dental-facts-the-statistics-behind-caring-for-your-teeth/

 8.  NASA invented the alloy used for making braces

NASA invented the alloy used for making braces

If you wish to improve your smile with the help of braces, then you should know that NASA is responsible for concocting this particular metal alloy for their space program, and clever orthodontists started using it for making flexible, durable braces.

Source: http://www.space.com/731-nasa-spin-offs-bringing-space-earth.html

 9. Brushing is a real life-saver

Brushing is a real life-saver

With no exaggeration, brushing prevents periodontal disease along with many other dental issues, which have been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, pneumonia and arthritis, among other things.

Source: https://www.nationaldentalcare.com.au/30-fantastic-toothbrush-facts/

 

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Foods that Can Be Both Good and Bad for Teeth

Foods that Can Be Both Good and Bad for Teeth

Since we were kids, we have been taught that candy and other sugary foods can cause a great deal of damage to our teeth. But how about fruit and vegetables? While many of these foods may be good for teeth whitening and fresh breath, you should be very careful with their consumption and try to take care for your teeth soon after eating them.

Foods good for teeth

Apples are rich in vitamins that stimulate gums, increase saliva production in your mouth and clean tooth surfaces. They also fight bad breath. However, apples are high in acid, which is surprisingly hard on your enamel. Eating apples is fine, as long as you make sure to rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash shortly after.

Lemon

Lemon

In one of our recent blog posts we mentioned a surprising research report that showed how eating plenty of lemons and oranges can protect tooth enamel, thanks to the increase of saliva production. But try to take it easy on them. If acidic fruit like lemons, limes, and oranges are eaten in excess or kept in the mouth for an extended amount of time, their acids can soften and erode tooth enamel. This weakens the strength of the teeth and makes them prone to sensitivity and decay. Lemon juice showed the most severe damage to frontal enamel, followed by grapefruit and orange juice.

Onions

Onions

Yes, we know this sounds strange, considering the fact that we all try to avoid onion breath,, but consuming raw onion is known to improve the strength of your teeth, and fight off bacteria which can cause tooth decay! Not only does chewing raw onion kill most germs in your mouth, but rubbing an onion on a sore tooth can also relieve a toothache.

Raisins

Raisins

Thanks to their sugar content and stickiness, you may think that raisins are a disaster for your pearly whites. Nevertheless, you will be surprised how protective they can be. Did you know that cereals with raisins help clean the mouth faster than those without raisins? Chewing raisins stimulates saliva, and therefore helps prevent plaque, stains and cavities.

Herbal tea

Herbal tea

Just like coffee, herbal tea contains tannin, a substance that may lead to leaving stains on your teeth. On the other hand, green and black tea contain beneficial organic chemicals called polyphenols that interact with the plaque, causing bacteria by killing or suppressing them. This is why tea is a great drink choice, especially during or after meal, since it reduces the presence of these acid producing bacteria in your mouth.

What you eat has a great impact on your oral health, so try to make healthier choices if you want to have a beautiful and healthy set of teeth.

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Biggest Oral Care Innovations and the Future of Dental Care

Biggest Oral Care Innovations and the Future of Dental Care

The evolution journey of a simple tool such as a toothbrush and our beloved toothpaste has been a long and curious one. Now, as we no longer have to worry about being crushed by a woolly mammoth, and we live in an era of both technologically creative and forward-thinking individuals, we can finally deliver outstanding solutions for oral care.

Digitalizing Dentistry

oral care

It’s all about providing simpler, more comfortable procedures, more accurate, precise techniques with the latest digital impression systems. Images produced with this technology allow your dentist to see exactly the source of your problems, communicate more easily with their laboratory and create a seamless, much more efficient process.
With the added perks of having a 3D printer, they are now able to create lifelike models for each patient, simplifying the diagnosis and treatment altogether.

UV Light to the Rescue

UV Light to the Rescue

Taking dental hygiene to a whole new level, the application of UV light for cleaning your toothbrushes has become the talk of the town. Removing germs and bacteria with a staggering precision of up to 99.9%, these sanitizers are real life-savers for any household.
Made available to anyone, sanitizers should not be taken for granted. They use their germicidal power of UV light to keep your brushes as clean as they can be, helping you maintain healthy teeth and gums, and they even come in travel-friendly form.

Practicality Takes Precedence

Practicality Takes Precedence

Multifunctional gadgets that take up less space and save time, durable materials and cutting-edge functionality is what the future is all about.
Standalone toothbrushes, made to be fun and simple to use even for kids, toothbrushes with built-in mirrors, and sonic brushes that make your hygiene more efficient are all great choices in achieving a bright, healthy smile. Designers keep finding new ways to simplify our daily lives and boost our health more than ever.

Creative Prevention

Creative Prevention

Having so many modern distractions at their fingertips, kids manage to find new ways to avoid caring for their teeth. And there’s no way you could ever convince them that such an activity could be fun. Or is there?
With kids in mind, technology has stepped in and found ways to boost their interest and discipline with regular brushing. All the way from fun designs, cartoon-inspired toothbrush caps, self-balancing rocking brushes, to games and apps that keep them interested, technology has turned a boring chore into a fun activity any youngster will look forward to.

 

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6 Most Common Oral Care Myths

6 Most Common Oral Care Myths

How much do you actually know about your oral care? Having false information about your oral health can be harmful and lead to serious damage and dental problems. These key facts will help you take the best care of your pearly whites! Let’s demystify six of the most common oral care myths that are unfortunately widely accepted by many people.

Myth #1: Brush teeth after every meal

oral care myths

Fact: This is probably one of the worst things you can do, especially after consuming something acidic, like oranges, grapefruit or lemon juice. Your tooth enamel becomes softer and more sensitive after eating, and brushing your teeth immediately after meals can weaken tooth enamel in a big way! Instead, chew a sugar-free gum that can neutralize acids and produce saliva so your mouth will get back to a neutral pH level.

Myth #2: Sugar is the worst enemy

Myth #2: Sugar is the worst enemy

Fact: This is something our parents used to say every time we were craving for a sweet treat. What they didn’t know is that it’s not about the amount of sugar you eat, but the length of time the sugar remains in your mouth. When consuming carbohydrates, the bacteria present in the mouth produces acids, which can cause cavities and tooth decay. So, the next time you enjoy a sweet snack, make sure you brush your teeth thoroughly to prevent a breeding ground for bacteria.

Myth #3: White teeth = healthy teeth

Myth #3: White teeth = healthy teeth

Fact: Not necessarily. Your teeth may be white but that doesn’t mean there aren’t signs of infection or cavities stuck somewhere in between. Healthy teeth come in a wide range of natural shades. People with healthy teeth may have darker teeth than others. No matter how trendy it is to have pearly whites today, always remember—healthy teeth will never fall out of fashion!

Myth #4: Stop brushing bleeding gums

Myth #4: Stop brushing bleeding gums

Fact: Bleeding gums are often an early sign of gingivitis, a gum disease, usually caused by smoking, diabetes or medications. Many people believe the misconception that when your gums are bleeding you shouldn’t brush them at all, so they can heal themselves. Little do they know that brushing is not only good for teeth, but also for your gums and tongue. It helps get rid of plaque, which causes inflammation that can eventually lead to gum disease. The key is not to brush too hard, especially if you have sensitive gums, and use a softer toothbrush.

Myth #5: Bleaching makes your teeth weaker

Myth #5: Bleaching makes your teeth weaker

Fact: There is actually no need to fear that bleaching products will weaken your teeth. If used according to the instructions, bleaching products are completely harmless. It is simply a color change and it doesn’t affect your teeth’s health or strength. Nowadays, most of the teeth whitening products are PH neutral and they don’t cause any harm to the root or enamel. Just make sure you have your bleaching done by properly following the instructions, or have it performed by a qualified dentist. If you are not a fan of teeth whitening products, there is an alternative and effective way of getting a whiter set of teeth with home-made ingredients, straight from your kitchen!

Myth #6: Putting an aspirin on the tooth can reduce toothache instantly

Myth #6: Putting an aspirin on the tooth can reduce toothache instantly

Fact: Actually, it will make everything worse. Placing Aspirin on a tooth can cause an acidic chemical burn to your gums and lips as well. And that is far from pain relief! Dentists advise not to take too many Aspirin tablets if you suffer from toothache. If you are unable make it to the dentist immediately, an over-the-counter pain-killer is better option than using Aspirin directly on your teeth.
It is of a great importance that you get educated about your dental care. The more you know about your oral health, the easier it will be to prevent decay and infection. Don’t believe everything you hear before checking it with your dentist first.

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